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Spo-fans know I am crackers for linguistics, so you can imagine my delight when I woke this morning to the cacophony on the internet, which was all in a swivet about Hair Furor’s  tweet  word “covfefe”.  I found it marvelous. I am glad to see people still care about language and words enough to go ballistic over neologisms and have fun with them as well.  In most cases the history of a word’s evolution is slow and without clear origins.  Covfefe clearly has a precise progenitor. Now starts the fun of watching the nonsense word solidify into one or two precise definitions. I hope my heart-throb ersatz boyfriend Paul Anthony Jones at Haggard Hawks is prophetic when he tweeted:

COVFEFE is an 18th century dialect word meaning ‘to not know what you are doing”.  

I confess I am a bit jealous of HF’s word’s success, for I have made up many words but none have gotten into the public’s general use. One of the fascinating and lovely attributes of English is it is continually bringing in new words, whether borrowed from other languages or created out of bits like Frankenstein’s monster.  This makes English a vibrant and growing language.*

So – if I can’t make them up, I advocate the return of marvelous words that have fallen out of favor.

Here’s some lovelies. Try to tell as many people as you can in town.

 

Blivit – something for which one cannot find a word; something difficult to name.

Boketto – the act of gazing vacantly into the distance without thinking.

Brummagem – cheap, showy, or counterfeit.

Esurient – hungry or greedy.

Expergefactor – something that wakes you up.

Grubbling – the act of searching for small objects in ones pocket or desk drawer. It’s a bit like groping but less organized and specific.

Kenopsia – the eerie atmosphere of a place once bustling with life and activity that is now quiet.

Nerdle – a sudden surprising squeeze of a limb by another which makes the squeezed one jump and startle.

Perfervid – intense and impassioned.

Quisquillious – having the nature of rubbish.

 

Try using some in an email today!

*Compare that to French, where the there is an actual academy to try to keep that language ‘pure’. This feckless endeavor is not even close to being done. I hear tell thems in charge are only up to the letter ‘P” in the book on proper French words. When the officious rule book is concluded it will be both outdated and ignored.

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